Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Buffet Hutch - Part eight - Making the hutch

This is a continuation of the posts:

Buffet Hutch - Part one - Drawing up the plans
Part two - Same style different finish
Part three - The buffet face frame
Part four - The buffet sides and web frames
Part five - Drawers 
Part six - Doors and wood movement
Part seven -  Designing the Hutch


There will be two sides of solid pine that will need dovetail grooves to hold the shelves, a rabbet at the top to hold the top and a rabbet down the back edge to sit the back pieces in.  The dovetail grooves are first run through with a straight bit in order to remove some of the material and make the dovetail bit have an easier time cutting through.

Side piece:
 
(the cutout piece you can see above in the right corner will hold a horizontal piece for the back to sit against)

This shows the shelf sliding in from the back and also the rabbet along the back edge:

The face frame for the hutch:
 

An important note.  My face frame clips over the sides, as I've explained earlier in the buffet post.  So it doesn't just butt up to the side edges, it goes over them. This means the shelves and top piece have to sit back 3/8" from the side edges so that they will butt up to the face frame.




Here's a closeup view of the side sitting in the style:
  

A view from the back of the shelves and top in place:
 (You can also see that they sit up against the face frame)


Almost finished, just the back and top moldings to do...

Continue on to: 




Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Buffet Hutch - Part seven - Designing the Hutch

This is a continuation of the posts:

Buffet Hutch - Part one - Drawing up the plans
Part two - Same style different finish
Part three - The buffet face frame
Part four - The buffet sides and web frames
Part five - Drawers

Part six - Doors and wood movement



Now it's time to look at the hutch design. I wanted a more solid look, which will include a face frame around the hutch as well as cove molding on the top.




The original inspiration photo had a hutch like this:


 As you can see, this one has sides that are cut in a curvy pattern without a front face frame and no top other than a backing edge. This is a common country style used for many years.  Mine is a little more substantial and more work. Of course, it is what look you prefer.

So, the hutch will be like a box with three sides and have a face frame and molding applied on to it.  Breaking it down we have two side pieces, a top and two shelves for the first component.  I have decided to use sliding dovetails as the way to attach the shelves to the sides.  This is strong and "hooks" the shelves in like a puzzle piece, as well there are no nail or screw heads showing on the sides.

Here's a sketch of the hutch without the face frame, including a closeup view of the dovetails:

Continuing with more in a few days...
Continue on to:  Part eight - Making the hutch